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Full text of "The gentleman and cabinet-maker's director : being a large collection of ... designs of household furniture in the Gothic, Chinese and modern taste ... : to which is prefixed, a short explanation of the five orders of architecture and rules of perspective, with proper directions for executing the most difficult pieces, the mouldings being exhibited at large, and the dimensions of each design specified ..."

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THE 



GENTLEMAN 



AND 



C A B I N E TM A K E R'» 

DIRECTOR. 



BEING A LARGE 



COLLECTION 



OF THE MOST 



Elegant and Ufeful Defigns of Houfhold Furniture 



IN THE 



GOTHIC, CHINESE and MODERN TASTE: 

Including a great Variety of 



BOOK-CASES for Librarie s or Private 

Rooms. COMMODES, 
LIBRARY and WRITING-TABLES, 
BUROES, BREAKFAST-TABLES, 
DRESSING and CHINA-TABLES, 
CHINA-CASES, HANGING-SHELVES, 



TEA-CHESTS, TRAYS, FIRE-SCREENS, 
CHAIRS, SETTEES, SOPHA'S, BEDS, 
PRESSES and CLOATHS-CHESTS, 
PIER-GLASS SCONCES, SLAB FRAMES, 
BRACKETS, CANDLE-STANDS, 
CLOCK-CASES, FRETS, 



AND OTHER 

ORNAMENTS. 

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED, 

A Short EXPLANATION of the Five ORDERS of ARCHITECTURE, 
and RULES of PERSPECTIVE; 

WITH 

Proper Directions for executing the moft difficult Pieces, the Mouldings being exhibited 
at large, and the Dimenfions of each Design fpecified : 

THE WHOLE COMPREHENDED IN 

One Hundred and fcixty COPPER-PLATES, neatly Engraved, 

Calculated to improve and refine the prefent Taste, and fuited to the Fancy and Circumftances of 

Perfons in all Degrees of Life. 

Dulcique animos novitate tenebo. Ovid. 
Ludentis fpeciem dabit & torquebitur. Hor. 

THOMAS CHIPPENDALE, 

Of St. MARTINA-LANE, CABINET-MAKER. 



LONDON, 

Printed for the AUTHOR, and fold at his Houfe in St. Martin's-Lane. Mdccliv. 
Alfo by T. Osborne, Bookfeller, in Gray's-lnn ; H. Piers, Bookfeller, in Holborn ; R. Sayer, Print- 
feiler, in Fleetftreet •, J. Swan, near Northumberland-Houfe, in the Strand. At Edinburgh, by 
Meflrs. Hamilton and Balfour : And at Dublin, by Mr. John Smith, on the Blind-Quay. 






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^And^of the LORDS of tbe Bed Chamber to His M A JEST Y. )8cv. 
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THE 



PREFACE. 



OF all the Arts which are either improved or ornamented 
by Architedure, that of CA B I N ET-M A K 1 N G is 
not only the mod ufeful and ornamental, but capable of receiving as 
great afliftance from it as any whatever. I have therefore prefixed to 
the following defigns a fhort explanation of the five Orders. Without 
an acquaintance with this fcience, and fome knowledge of the rules 
of Perfpeitive, the Cabinet-maker cannot make the defigns of his 
work intelligible, nor ihew, in a little compafs, the whole conduit 
and effe6t of the piece. Thefe, therefore, ought to be carefully 
ftudied by every one who would excel in this branch, iince they are 
the very foul and bafis of his art. 

The Title-Page has already called the following work, The 
Gentleman and Cabinet-Makers Direttor, as being calculated to aillft 
the one in the choice, and the other in the execution of the defigns ; 
which are fo contrived, that if no one drawing fliould fingly anfwer 
the Gentleman's tafte, there will yet be found a variety of hints 
fufficient to conftruft a new one. 

a I HAVE 





















■ 



IV 



The P R E FA C E. 









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I have been encouraged to begin and carry on this work not 
only (as the puff* in the play-bill fays) by perfons of diftin&ion, 
but of eminent tafte for performances of this fort ; who have, upon 
many occalions, fignified fome furprize and regret, that an art ca- 
pable of fo much perfection and refinement, fhould be executed with 
fo little propriety and elegance. How far the following fheets may 
remove a complaint which I am afraid is not altogether groundlefs, 
the judicious reader will determine : I hope, however, the novelty, as 
well as the ufefulnefs of the performance, will make fome atonement 
for its faults and imperfeftions. I am fenfible there are too many to 
be found in it ; for I frankly confefs, that in executing many of the 
drawings, my. pencil has but faintly copied out thofe images that 
my fancy fuggefted ; and had they not been publiflied till I could 
have pronounced them perfe£fc, perhaps they had never feen the 
light. Neverthelefs, I was not upon that account afraid to let them 
go abroad, for 1 have been told that the greateft mailers of every 
other art have laboured under the fame difficulty. 






A late writer, of diftinguifhed tafte and abilities, (peaking of 
the delicacy of every author of genius with refpe6t to his own per- 
formances, obferves, that he has the continual mortification to find 
himfelf incapable of taking entire pofleflion of that ideal beauty that 
warms and fills his imagination. 

Never, fays he, (in a quotation from Tully ) was any 
thing more beautiful than the Venus of Apelles, or the Jove of 
Phidias, yet w r ere they by no means equal to thofe high notions 
of beauty which animated the geniufes of thofe wonderful artifts. 
The cafe is the fame in all arts where tafte and imagination are con- 
cerned ; and I am perfuaded that he who can furvey his own works 
with entire fatisfaction and complacency, will hardly ever find the 
world of the fame favourable opinion with himfelf. 

I am not afraid of the fate an author ufually meets with on his 
firft appearance, from a fet of critics who are never wanting to (hew 

their 



H 



The PREFACE. v 

their wit and malice on the performances of others : I fhall repay 
their cenfures with contempt. Let them unmolefted deal out their 
pointlefs abufe, and convince the world they have neither good- 
nature to commend, judgment to correal, nor {kill to execute what 
they find fault with. 

The correction of the judicious and impartial I (hall always re- 
ceive with diffidence in my own abilities and refpe£t to theirs. But 
tho' the following defigns were more perfe& than my fondnefs for 
my own offspring could ever fuppofe them, I fhould yet be far 
from expe£ting the united approbation of ALL thofe whofe fenti- 
ments have an undoubted claim to be regarded ; for a thou- 
fand accidental circumftances may concur in dividing the opi- 
nions of the moft improved judges, and the moft unprejudi- 
ced will find it difficult to difengage himfelf from a partial affec- 
tion to fome particular beauties, of which the general courfe of 
his ftudies, or the peculiar caft of his temper may have rendered 
him moft fenfible. The mind, when pronouncing judgment upon 
any work of tafte and genius, is apt to decide of its merit ac- 
cording as thofe circumftances which fhe moft admires either prevail 
or are deficient. Thus, for inftance, (fays the ingenious author 
before quoted) the excellency of the Roman mafters in painting 
confifts in beauty of dejign, noblenefs of attitude, and delicacy 
of expreflion, but the charms of good colouring are wanting : 
On the contrary, the Venetian fchool is faid to have neglected 
dejign a little too much, but at the fame time has been more at- 
tentive to the grace and harmony of well-difpofed lights and 
/hades. Now it will be admitted by all admirers of this noble 
art, that no compofition of the pencil can be perfe&, where either 
)f thefe qualities are abfent ; yet the moft accomplifhed judge may 
be fo particularly ftruck with one or other of thefe excellencies, in 
preference to the reft, as to be influenced in his cenfure or applaufe 
of the whole tablature, by the predominacy or deficiency of his fa- 
vourite beauty. Something of this kind, tho' the following fheets had 
all the perfe£l:ion of human compofition, would no doubt fubje& 
them in many things to the cenfure of the moft approved judges, 

whofe 



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VI 



The PREFACE. 



Ha 

JH 



whofe applaufe I lhould efteem my greateft honour, and whofe cor- 
rection I lhall ever be proud to improve by. 

Upon the whole, Ihave here given no defign but what may be 
executed with advantage by the hands of a fkillful workman, tho' 
fome of the profeflion have been diligent enough to reprefent them 
(efpecially thofe after the Gothic and Chinefe manner) as fo many 
fpecious drawings, impoffible to be work'd off by any mechanic 
whatfoever. I will not fcruple to attribute this to malice, ignorance 
and inability : And I am confident I can convince all Noblemen, 
Gentlemen, or others, who will honour me with their commands, 
that every defign in the book can be improved, both as to beauty 
and enrichment, in the execution of it, by 



Their Mojt Obedient Servant. 



St. Martin's-Lane, 
March 23, 1754. 



Thomas Chippendale. 




THE 



[ vii ] 






THE 



sy 



NAMES 






OF THE 



SUBSCRIBERS. 



SI R John Anftruther, bart. 
Mr. James Affleck, upholder 
Mr. James Affleck, cabinet-maker 
Thomas Atkinfon, cabinet-maker 

— - Allan, joiner 

William Allanfon 

James Anderfon, cabinet maker 

John Addifon, carpenter 

Robert Arnot 

Samuel Agar, carver 

B 

His Grace the Duke of Beaufort 
William Bradfhaw, efq; 
Thomas Bladden, efq; 
William Belchier, efq; 
Mr. John Belchier, furgeon 

Thomas Belchier, cabinet-maker 

John Buck, cabinet-maker 

Robert Brown, cabinet-maker 

Jofeph Brown, cabinet-maker 

William Benfon, cabinet-maker 

-Badger, carver 

Peter Burcham 

John Burgefs, joyner 

Brett, enameller 

— Barwell, 

John Bland 

John Barber, cabinet-maker 

Thomas Bay 

John Burry 

John Bladwell, upholder 

James Burby, cabinet-maker 

George Brum ell 

Barnard Broadbett, painter 



Brand, carver 



William Bradbury 

John Butter, joyner 

William Butler, cabinet-maker 

Peter Blankinfop 

Robert Barker, upholder, at York' 



The Right Hon. the Earl of Chefterfield 

The Right Hon. Lord Clifford 

The Hon. Francis Chartres, of Ampf- 

field, efq; 
The Rigth Hon. Lady Catharine Chartres 
Sir Thomas Clavering 
John Craigie, of Dunbarnie, efq; 
William Connolly, efq; 
Ralph Congreve. efq; 

Cheere, efq; 

Mr. Archibald Carmichall 

James Caddell, Upholfterer 
Csefar Crouch 

James Clyes 

Thomas Chapman 

Robert Campbell 

John Clair, cabinet-maker 

Charles Cook, joyner 

.Collins, upholder 

Channon, fenr. cabinet-maker 

. Channon, jun. cabinet-maker 

James Clydfdale 

Thomas Clayton, plaiflerer of Hamilton 

Robert Corney 

Robinfon Cook, at Liverpool 

. Cauty, cabinet-maker 

John Crofby, cabinet-maker 

Jofeph Cooper 

i — Cooper, cabinet-maker 

b Henry 






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Tie SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. 



i 



J 



1 









■ 






Mr. Henry Conftable, upholfterer 

<- Crook, plaifterer 

Jofeph Conyears, cabinet-maker 
John Chambers 



D 

The Right Hon. Lord Delawar 
Sir Conycis D'Arcy, knt. of the Bath 
Lewis Douglas, of Garwald, efq; 
George Dempfter, of Dunichen, efq; 
Mr. William Dempfter, jeweller 

Thomas Dawfon, cabinet-maker 

Robert Dawfon 

John Dale, cabinet-maker 

Richard Denham 

Thomas Dade, joyner 

Thomas Davis, joyner 

James Davis 

William Davifon, cabinet-maker 

Thomas Dean, cabinet-maker 

George Dickfon, cabinet-maker 

William Dirndl 

*- Dorrington 

William Dee 

Allexander Dingwall, cabinet-maker 

Solomon Dingle, joyner 

Richard Dark, upholfterer 

Matthias Daily, engraver 



E 



The Rt. Hon. Lord Elphinfton 

Augufline Earle, efq; 

Mr. George Edwards 

Charles Edward?, enammeller 
El wick, upholder 



John Goodeyre, cabinet-maker 

Richard Giilow 

Samuel Goulding 

Thomas Gill 

Nathaniel Goldfmith 

Edward Griffith 

Samuel Goulding 

H 

His Grace the Duke of Hamilton 
The Right Hon. the Earl of Hopton 
The Right Hon. the Earl of Hallifax 
Robert Hamilton of Kilbrookmont, efq; 
Archibald Hope, of Ranquillor, efq; 
Mr. Thomas Hooper 

Thomas Hopper, cabinet-maker, 2 Books 

William Howdell 

Nathaniel Hobfon, cabinet-maker 

Aaron Hardcaftle, joyner 

Robert Hudfon, cabinet-maker. 

William Henderfon 

Holl 

lfaac Hoyle 

William Hollingfworth 

William Henfhaw 

William Hunter, upholder 

James Hodges 

Pearce Hall, cabinet-maker 

Anthony Hilker, picmre-frame-maker 
■ Hardman, upholder 

— - Halfey, carver 

HughHarrifon, atRichmond mire, York 

David Hopkins, cabinet-maker 

Samuel Hayworth, carver 

William Halfe, cabinet-maker 

James Hudibn, cabinet-maker 

Chriftopher Higgions 



■ 



c 



The Right Hon. Lord Feverfham 
Mr. John Fothergill, joyner 

William Farmborough, cabinet-maker 

William Franks, bricklayer 

John France 

George Fairweather, cabinet-maker 

Farrant 

Henry Foy, cabinet-maker 

Benjamin Fox, cabinet-maker, 2 books 

Richard Farrer, upholder, York 






G 



Thi Rt. Hon . Lord Guildford 
The Rt. Hon. Lord Guernfey 
Mr. Francis Guillander, enameller 

James Gray 

William Gordon, cabinet-maker 

Ambroie Godfrey, chymift 

Gaffield, cabinet-maker. 

Robert Green 

Jonathan Greenwell 

Richard Gomm 

-Godkll 

Edward Good, upholder 

James Good, ditto 

Gearing 



Mr. Leonard Jennings, cabinet-maker 
Thomas Jellings, cabinet-maker 
William Jnce, cabinet-maker 
John Jeffries, upholder 
Jofeph Jackfon, cabinet-maker 
Caleb Jeacock, cabinet-maker 

Jeffier, cabinet-maker 

Owen Jones, cabinet-maker 



K 



His Grace the Duke of Kingfton 
Mr. John Kier, cabinet-maker 

William Kaygill , cabinet-maker 

John Kingfton 

Quintin Kay 

Kilpin, upholder 

Alexander Kincaid, cabinet-maker 

Knowles 



The Mod Hon. Marquifs of Lothian 
Lady Lewis, of Trentham 
Thomas Lundin, of Lundin, efq; 
James Lumifden, of Runnyhill, efq; 
Mr. David Lothian Mr. 



Me SUBSCRIBERS NAMES. 



IX 



Mr. Jofeph Lockyer 

« *** Lee, cabinet-maker 

John Lindow 

Lewis 

Jofeph Lonfdale 
Thomas Linfoot 
John Lilly 
Thomas Long 

M 

The Right Hon. Earl of Morton 
• The Right Hon. Lord Montford 



Mitchell, efq; 



Mr. William Miller, cabinet-maker 
William Miller, upholder 
George Marm, cabinet-maker 
Alexander Mc Aull 
■ Manton, founder 

Jofeph Mathifon, cabinet-maker 
Robert Mabberly, painter 
Robert Melvill, cabinet-maker 

Milldew, cabinet-maker 

James Mofs, joyner 
Daniel Mafon 

Nathaniel Martindale, cabinet-maker 
Archibald Murry, 
Charles Marquand 
John Morland 
Charles Magniac 

Thomas Malton, of Nottingham, cabi- 
net-maker 

Mainlove, upholfter 



Peter Main 



N 



His Grace the Duke of Norfolk 
Her Grace the Dutchefs of Norfolk 
The Right Hon. Earl of Northumberland 
Mr. Patrick Nicholfon 

John Newman, cabinet-maker 

Ifaac Newman, cabinet-maker 

Adam Nelfon 

John Nottingham 

Jeremiah Nance, founder 



R 

Sir Thomas Robinfon, bart. 

Reeves, efq; 

Mr. Rivington, bookfeller 

Andrew Reed, cabinet-maker 

John Ranken, cabinet-maker 

James Rannie, cabinet-maker 

John Ridge, cabinetmaker 

Francis Richardfon 

Roger Roe 

John Raifin, joyner 

George Rook 

John Roberts, cabinet-maker 

George Reynolds, cabinet-maker 

Francis Roux, engraver 

George Reynoldfon, upholder, York 

Timothy Roberts, cabinet-maker 



The Right Hon. Countefs of Shaftfbury 
David Scott, of Scotftarvct, efq; 
David Smith, of Methven, cfdj 
Mr. Robert Spence, cabinet-maker 

George Seddon, cabinet maker 

John Simpfon, carpenter 

Thomas Simpfon 

Mathias Simpfon, carpenter 

Jofiah Sutton, enammeller 

Hugh Spear, cabinet-maker 

Paul Saunders, upbolfterer 

John Spark, cabinet-maker 

James Scholefield, watch-maker 

Sackham, upholder 

Shane, upholder 

— Sayer, bookfeller, 6 Books- 
Francis Say, upholder 

Swan, bookfeller, 12 Books 

Scott, carver 

David Stevenfon, cabinet-maker 

Stabler, and Barftovv, bookfellers, York 

George Stevenfon 

Samuel Shatford, cabinet-maker 







O 



Mr. Thomas Ofbom 



His Grace the Duke of Portland 
Mr. James Payne, architect 

Platts, cabinet-maker 

Robert Parker, carver 

Thomas Parker, carver 

Benjamin Parran, cabinet-maker 

James Pit, joyner 

— -Pawfon, merchant 

Charles Pinhorn 

George Phillips 

John Prefton, cabinet-maker 

John Paterfon, cabinet-maker 

Jofiah Pennock, carver 



John Thompfbn, of Charleton, efq; 
Alexander Thirtieth waite, cfqj 
Mr. John Troughton> cabinet-maker 
Charles Tuttop, cabinet-maker 
John Trotter, cabinet-maker 
William Trewin, cabinet-maker 
Benoni Thacker, carpenter 

Tack, organ -maker 



Jofeph Tyler 



u 



Mr. Richard Underwood 
Philip Upton 

Hugh Underwood, cabinet-maker, Scar- 
borough 



& 



Mr. William Vancailer 



Mr. 






The SUBSCRIBERS- NAMES. 



I 



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Mr. Thomas Varly 
. Charles Verco 
Gerrard Vander-Gucht 
Richard Vanhagan 

W 

Walter Wemys, of Lothocker, efq; 
William Webfter, joyner 
John Willis 

James Ware, cabinet-maker 
James White, cabinet-maker 
John Walkinton, cabinet-maker 
George Weft, cabinet-maker 
Thomas Whittle, carver 
David Waters, cabinet-maker 



John Waters, cabinet-maker 

Charles Warrell, joyner 

Richard Wood, in York, 8 Books 

Richard Wood 

John White, cabinet-maker 

Henry Watfon 

William Williams, cabinet-maker 

Richard Wright, upholder 

John Wright, York 



Lady Young 
^YJuriP-fefrorsofPhilofophy 

Robert Young 






I 




THE 







THE 



GENERAL PROPORTIONS 



OF THE 



TUSCAN ORDER. 

PLATE I. N°. i. 

TAKE any Height propofed for this Order, and divide it into five equal 
Parts, one of thofe Parts fhall be the Height of the Pedeftal according 
to the fmall Divifion of the Scale, on the left Hand ; the other four 
Parts above muft be divided into five Parts, according to the outmoft Line on the 
left Hand ; the upper fifth Part fhall be the Height of the Entablature, and the 
other four Parts betwixt the Pedeftal and Entablature, fhall be the Height of the 
Column, including its Bafe and Capital ; and this Height being divided into feven 
Parts, one of thofe Parts will be the Diameter of the Column, which Diameter is 
divided into fixty equal Parts, and is called a Module ; and this will ferve to fet off 
all the Mouldings for this Order. You have all the Particulars of the Mouldings 
at large on the right Hand ; the Bafe and Capital are each in Height a Semi-diame- 
ter of the Column ', the Column muft be divided into three equal Parts betwixt the 
Capital and Bafe, and from the Top of the lower Divifion it is diminished 4 of 
its Semi-diameter on each Side. The Method of diminifhing the Column is ex- 
plained in the middle Scheme ; the Breadth of the Die of the Pedeftal is deter- 
mined by the Projection of the Bafe of the Column. 



THE 



GENERAL PROPORTIONS 



OF THE 



DORICK ORDER. 

PLATE II. N°. * 

TAKE any Height upon a ftraight Line, as in the Tuscan Order, and di- 
vide it into five equal Parts, one of them fhall be the Height of the Pe- 
deftal ; the other four Parts muft be divided into five Parts, one of which is the 
Height of the Entablature ; the remaining four Parts muft be divided into eight 

A Parts, 






Br' 









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[ 2 ] ,# 

Parts; one of them is the Diameter of the Column, or Module, which divide into 
fixty equal Parts, as in the Tuscan Order, to fet off all the Mouldings, as you 
will fee on the right Hand, where you have the Plan of the Cornice. The 
Column diminifhes 4 of its Semi-diameter on each Side, from t Part of its 
Height to the Top of the Capital. The Bafe and Capital are each in Height 
a Semi-diameter. 

THE 

GENERAL PROPORTIONS 

OF THE 

IONICK. ORDER. 

PLATE III. M 3- 

TAKE any Height, as in the foregoing Orders, and divide it into five equal 
Parts, one of thefe Parts is the Height of thePedeftal ; the other four being 
divided into fix Parts, one of them is the Height of the Entablature ; the remain- 
ing four Parts muft be divided into nine equal Parts ; one of them is the Diameter 
of the Column or Module, which is divided into fixty equal Parts as before ; the 
Mouldings are at large, with a Scale or Module to draw them. The Column is 
diminifhed 4- of its Semi-diameter on each Side, from i Part of its Height. The 
Bafe and Capital are each in Height a Semi-diameter. 



THE 



GENERAL PROPORTIONS 



^ 



OF THE 



CORINTHIAN ORDER. 
PLATE IV. N ; . 4. J 

TH E whole Height is divided into five Parts; one of them muft be for the 
Pedeftal, the other four remaining Parts muft be divided into five ; one of 
them will give the Height of the Entablature, the other four, betwixt the Pedeftal 
and Entablature, muft be divided into ten Parts, one of which is the Diameter ol 
the Column, or Module, which divide into fixty equal Parts as before ; the Bale is 
in Height a Semi-diameter of the Column ; the Capital is one Module, and ten 
Parts, in Height -.'The other Dimenfions are as in the Ionick Order. 

THE 



■ 



[ a ] 



THE 



GENERAL PROPORTIONS 



OF THE 



COMPOSITE ORDER. 



PLATE V. N°. 5. 

TAKE any determined Height, as in the Corinthian Order, and divide it 
into five Parts, one Part mail be the Height of the Pedeftal, the other four 
Parts muft be divided again into five Parts as before ; one of them is the Height of 
the Entablature : The Height of the Capital is one Module, and ten Parts : The 
Column diminifhes | of its Semi-diameter on each Side, from one third Part of the 
Height. The Dimenfions are as in the Corinthian Order. 



1 I 



THE 



BASES 



FOR THE 



COLUMN S. of each ORDER. 



PLATE VI. N°. 6. 

TH E Bafes are in Height a Semi-diameter of the Column, their Projections are 
1. of the Height ; their Members are of an eafy Form, being moft of them 
a Semi-circular, except the Scotia, which is a Mixti-linear drawn from two Centers, 
in this Manner, as in the Ionick Bafe. Having drawn and divided the Bignefs of 
each Member, and the Centers of the upper and lower Torus, then let fall a Per- 
pendicular from the Center of the upper Torus, and divide it within the Space of 
the Scotia into feven Parts, the three uppermoft will be the Segment of the Circle 
drawn to the oblique Line : The other Segment is drawn by fixing the Center 
where the Oblique cuts the Perpendicular ; the other Scotias are drawn in the fame 
Manner. The Mouldings are all the fame as prick' d or mark'd in the Orders. 



THE 









li 



J 



■ 



■ 



■ 






■Mj 



C'4 1 



T H E 



BASES andCAPS 



OF THE 



PEDESTALS of each ORDER 

PLATE VII. N°. 7. 

TH E Proje&ion of the Bafe of the Pedeftal is equal to its Height, and the 
Caps project the fame ; the Mouldings are prick'd off as they arc drawn 



Caps project 
in the Order before. 






I 



R U L E 

For. DRAWING the 

SPIRAL LINES of the VOLUTE 

OF THE 

IONICK ORDER 

PLATE VIII. N°. 8. 

TAKE your Compafles and extend from 1 i& the Eye of the Volute, to the 
greateft Extent, and fweep with them a Quarter of a Circle ; then holding 
ftill in the Point where the Compaffes ended the Quarter Circle, bring the 
other Point of the Compaffes to 2 in the Eye of the Volute; there fweep another 
Quarter of a Circle, ftill holding your Compaffes in that Point ; bring the other 
Point of your Compafles to 3 in the Eye of the Volute, and fweep another Quarter 
of a Circle , then hold your Compaffes in that Point, and bring the other Point of 
your Compafles to 4 in the Eye of the Volute, then fweep the other Quarter ; fo 
by this Means you will complete one Round of the Volute : Then proceed in the 
fame manner from 4, to 5, 6, 7, and fo on to 12. Take Notice of the Eye of 
the Volute at large, and obferve to divide each Divifion into three equal Parts, as 
is done betwixt 2 and 6, and let the Point of your Compafs be placed in the Points 
r, d, /, 6cc. to diminifh the Fillet of the Volute. 



Hi 



RULES 






[ 5 ] 



RULES 



TO DRAW 



CHAIRS in PERSPECTIVE. 



PLATE IX. N°. 9. 

FIGURE the Firft is the profile of a Chair with its proper dimenfions : To 
draw a Chair (fig. III.) in Perfpective, you muft firft draw the ground line 
E, then draw the horizontal line F, then mark your point of fight O, from 
thence fet off eight feet fix inches to V> the point of diftance ; the height of the 
horizontal line is always five feet fix inches from the ground line : Draw ano- 
ther line D, parallel to the ground line, for the feat of the Chair ; fet off your 
dimenfions at pleafure, fo as to make your defign look as well as poflible. 

Suppofe E E, one foot ten inches, the front of the Chair, then from the point 
of fight O draw OE, OE ; then from the profile, (fig. I.) take one foot fix inches 
and half CC, and fet it off to the right hand cc, and from thence draw two lines 
Vcc, till they cut the ray OE ; then fet off the bignefs of the back of your Chair 
one foot five inches and an half ; on the front of the Chair draw n n, &c. to 



nn 



the point of fight O; thofe lines cc, drawn from the point of diftance V, cut the 
vifual OE ; draw the lines parallel to the vifual, O nn, and where they interfecl 
in Onn, there the back foot will fall at the feat of the Chair. 

The diftance in the profile B, one foot nine inches and a half, fet off from E to 
bb, determines where the top of the back foot falls ; the fame method is taken for 
the bottom of the back foot. You fee one foot nine inches and three quarters taken 
from the profile fet upon the line drr ; the diftance m from the foot in the profile 
is fet off upon the ground line E m, which gives the crofs rail : The vifual lines 
Onn, mark'd upon the ground line E, give the breadth of the back foot at the 
bottom ; the line G, continued in g, from the corner of the Chair E up to P, is 
one foot ten inches ; from P draw a line to the point of fight, then raife two per- 
pendiculars from bb up to P, and the line drawn from P to the point of diftance 
V where it interfe6b in q, gives the determined height of the back of the 
Chair, ttt gives the breadth of the banifter at the bottom of the Chair, a a in the 
horizontal line are two points which anfwer to draw the top and bottom rails of 
the Chair, as the Chairs are lefs behind than before. 

Figure IV. is a front view of a Chair, and the meafures fet off as in the other 
Chair, and drawn to the fame point of fight and diftance. 



B 



Figure 



' 1 



I 



■ 






I 






■ 






MX-X 






fV'H 



i * ] 

Figure V. is for to take any of the Chairs in the book off at large. In order 
to get their proper fweeps, you muft firft draw a middle line on the back you in- 
tend to have, then draw fo many lines as are needful at an inch diftance from each 
other, and as many at £he:Tame diftance from the bottom as will go up to the top ; 
then you will fee in which of the fquares. the fweeps of the Chairs will fall. Then 
in your drawing at large, you muft draw as many fquares as are in the little one. 
It is no matter how big or how little you make your Chair, for you will ftill pre- 
ferve the fame proportion. So then if you obferve in what fquares your fweep 
falls in the fmall drawing, by obferving the fame in the large drawing, you may 
come at this or any other. 



■ i\- :. : ' «...;, : 



i. 



RULES 



FOR DRAWING 



c 



■ 



H 



A DRESSING-TABLE in Perspective. 







I 



PLATE X. N°. i a. 



ib, 



TO draw a Drefling-Table in Perfpe&ive, draw the line CAB; then from 
A to B fet off the length of your Table with its mouldings, and the recefs 
for the knees as you fee fpecified ; draw the lines to the point of fight ; then from 
C to A fet off the depth of the Table, with the recefs and mouldings, and draw 
them to the point of diftance till they cut the line OA, which drawn parallel to 
the line A B, gives the depth of the recefs and projections of the mouldings, and 
this compleats the plan D. 

The fame lines muft be continued to the diagonal line at the corner ; then draw 
the ground line E five feet fix inches from the horizontal line ; and from that line 
on the left hand fet off the height of your Table as you fee fpecified ; draw the 
mouldings to the point of fight O, then raife perpendiculars up from the diagonal, 
and where they interfect in the mouldings isv the projection of them. Pa- 
rallels to the ground line E, drawn from the mouldings in F, give the rife of the 
moulding in the Table, and perpendiculars raifed from the plan compleat the 
whole ; from A to d gives the depth of the recefs ; eee, &c. gives the length of 
the brackets, as you may fee by the perpendiculars raifed. I V 






RULES 






[ 7 ] 



RULES 



FOR DRAWING 



A BOOK-CASE in Perspective. 



PLATE XI. N°. ii. 

TO draw a Book-Cafe in Perfpectivc, draw the line A, and fet off the 
length of your Book-Cafe with its mouldings, and the depth of it on the 
fame line, as you fee the meafures fpecified : complete the plan D, and draw 
your parallels to the diagonal line at the corner. To make the plan E fet 
off the depth of the upper part of the Book-Cafe in the line B, and draw them 
to the vifual as before : this done, you may complete the plan E, draw the ground 
line M, and on the left hand fet off the height of your Book-Cafe, as you fee all 
the meafures fpecified ; draw all thefe meafures to the point of fight O, and raife 
perpendiculars from the diagonal, and you will have the projections of the mould- 
ing in F ; from every particular projection in F draw parallels to the ground line, 
to get the proper rife of your mouldings kkk, &rV. in the plan E is the projection 
of the cornice, and from thefe projections raife all your perpendiculars to the 
Book-Cafe. To draw the pediment in Perfpedive, you muft firft draw it as you fee 
it in G ; then from H you muft draw parallels to k, on the left hand ; then draw 
thofe lines marked in h down to the point of fight ; then draw the parallels from 
LL to bb, to give the rife of the particular members of the cornice. Then where 
the dotted lines in the plan of the cornice k interfecl: in the vifual line I, raife per- 
pendiculars to bb in the pediment, which give the projection of the mouldings in bb 
for a clofe pediment ; or if you have a mind to have it an open one, you muft 
raife perpendiculars from the mitres of the cornice kk. 






-i PLATES XII. XIII. XIV. and 



XV. 



io 




R E a variety of new-pattern Chairs, which, if executed according to their 
Defigns, and by a ikillful workman, will have a very good effecti The 
fore feet are all different for your better choice. If you think they are too much 
ornamented, that can be omitted at pleafure. The proper dimenfions of thofe 
Chairs are one foot ten inches in the front, one foot five inches ; behind, and one 
foot five inches from the front of the back foot to the front rail ; the back, one 
foot ten inches ; high ; the feat one foot five high ; but that is made lower accord- 
ing as the feat is to be fluffed. 

PLATE 



91 









m 

Jot- 









E 3 ] 



nra 



PLATE XVL 

IS three Ribband-back Chairs, which, if I may fpeak without vanity, are the 
beft I have ever feen (or perhaps have ever been made.) The Chan; on the 
left hand has been executed from this Defign, which had an excellent effedt, and 
cave fatisfacuon to all who faw it. I make no doubt but the other two will give 
the fame content, if properly handled in the execution. Their dimensions are 
affixed to the defign. 






I&& 



PLATES XVII. XVIII. XIX. and XX. 

ARE eight different defigns of French Elbow Chairs, of various patterns, 
which I hope will be of great ufe, if properly applied. Some of thofe 
Chairs are defign'd to be open below at the feat, which greatly lightens them, and 
has no ill effedt. The common fizes are as follows ; two foot three inches in front, 
one foot eleven inches over behind, one foot ten inches from the front of the back 
to the front of the feat rail. The feat is one foot two inches i high ; the height ot 
the back, from the feat, is two foot three inches ; but thofe dimensions differ accord- 
ing as the rooms are larger or fmaller : the ornaments on the backs and feats are in 
imitation of tapeftry or needlework. The carving may be lefiened by an ingenious 
workman without detriment to the Chair. 






PLATES XXI. and XXII. 

AR E fix new defigns of Gothic Chairs ; their feet are almoft all different, and 
may be of ufe to thofe that are unacquainted with this fort of work. Moft 
of the ornaments may be left out if required. The fizes are the fame as in the 
preceding Chairs, and may be leffened or enlarged, according to the fancy of the 
fkillful artift. 



■ 



■ 






PLATES XXIII. XXIV. and XXV. 

ARE nine Chairs in the prefent Chinefe manner, which I hope will improve 
that tafte, or manner of work ; it having yet never arrived to any per- 
fedion; doubtlefs it might be loft without feeing its beauty : as it admits of the 
areateft variety, I think it the moft ufeful of any other. The fizes are all fpeci- 
fied on the defigns. The three laft (No. XXV.) 1 hope will be well received, as 
there has been none like them yet made. 



PLATE 



[ 9 ] 






PLATE XXV- 

IS a Chinefe Sopha with a canopy over it, with its curtains and vallens all tied 
up in drapery. This defign may be converted into a bed, by having the Sopha 
fo made as to come forward, the curtains to draw to the front of the Sopha, and 
hang floping, which will form a fort of tent, and look very grand. The orna- 
ments are defigned for burnifhed gold. B is half the canopy ; A the lath the 
curtain hangs to ; C the profile of the wood work ; D an ornament that goes round 
the infide; E the French work, and f f the laths that are required. 






PLATE XXVI. 



T S a Chinefe Sopha, intended for the fame ufe as the former ; the defign is 
X different from the other, and if well executed by an ingenious workman, it 
can't fail of giving content. 



PLATE XXVII. 

IS a Bed with its proper dimenfions, which needs but a little explanation. B is 
a different cornice to be covered with the fame as the curtains ; aa-a, &c. is the 
lath with pullies fixed to draw the curtains up with. 

PLATE XXVIIL 

IS a Gothic Bed with a drapery Curtain ; the pofts are made into eight cants, 
and indented: B is one fourth part of the tefter ; a a is the fame length as 
A A, which muft go from corner to corner of the bedftead, to form the roof; this 
done, you have the corners or hipsTorm'd. Divide the length A A as you fee it, 
and then raife two perpendiculars up to B, and divide that length into the fame 
number of divifions as A A below, that gives the fweep of the ribs ccc, &c. The 
curtain is drawn up by one line on each fide, as you fee the pullies fixed at the 
corner. The other parts need no explanation. 



i 






PLATE 



[ io ] 



PLATE XXIX. 

IS a Gothic Bed the fame as the former, except the tefter, which is flat. This 
cornice will look extremely well, if properly work'd. A is the tefter lath ; 
ccc, gape, are the pullies where the lines are fixed ; B is an ornament to be made 
of the lace or binding of the furniture. 



PLATE XXX. 

IS a Canopy-Bed with drapery curtains and vallens, and head-board. The di- 
mensions are all fix'd to the defign. A is one-fourth of the tefter; C is a 
fmall oval dome in the infide, which begins at B; D is the outfide canopy ; HH 
are frets or ornaments to decorate the infide ; e e are the double laths ; f is the 
bed-poft ; g is the fide of the bedftead ; kkk, fifc. is the place where the pullies 
are to be fixed to draw the curtains up with. 



PLATE xxxi. 

IS a Dome-Bed , the fides of the dome and cornice I have form'd into an ellip- 
tical form, to take off the feeming weight which a bed of this kind has, when 
the cornice runs ftraight. There are four dragons going up from each corner ; the 
curtains and vallens are all in drapery. The head-board has a fmall Chinefe Temple, 
with a jofs, Or Chinefe God ; on each fide is a Chinefe man at worfhip ; the out- 
fide of the dome is intended to be japan'd, and Mofaic work drawn upon it; the 
other ornaments to be gilt ; but that is left to the will of thofe, who fhall pleafe 
to have it executed. A A is one quarter of the tefter> or plan with the ribs that 
are to form the dome ; the diftance A A in the plan, is the diftance A A in the 
profile above, which divided in the manner you fee, will ferve to make all the other 
ribs. Take the diftance A bbb, firV. and fet off at a a ; its rife is taken from the 
middle of the cornice to the greateft height or pitch of the dome, and divided into 
the fame number of divifions ; and then obferving where they interfecl: in the upper 
profile of the rib, or hip, make them interfecl; in the fame divifion as below, which 
method ferves to make all the reft. 



IK 



JL 



PLATE XXXII. 



IS a Chinefe Bed, the curtains and vallens are tied up in drapery, the tefter is 
canted at each corner, which makes a fort of an elliptical ornament or arch, 
and if well executed will look very well. 

F is a quarter of the tefter, with frets cut through, and the covering feen be- 
twixt. G is one-fourth of the oval dome, and E is the profile of it. D is the 

outfide 






[ 



II 



] 



outfide canopy, and the cant of the corner in the plan F is continued up the corner 
of the canopy ; B is the lath and ornament below it ; A is the profile of the cant 
of the corner of the tefter, which terminates into a point upon the poll ; C is the 
bed-poft. 



:v 






PLATE XXXIII. 



IS two Breakfaft-Tables ; the one has a ftretching rail, with feet canted and in- 
dented ; the other has a fhelf under the top with frets all round ; the front is 
cut out for a recefs for the knees, and two folding doors to open ; the dimensions 
are fixed to the defigns. 



i 



P L A 



T 



E xxxiv. 



IS two China or Breakfaft Tables, which will look extremely neat if well exe- 
cuted. A A are half the plans of the tops ; b b are the frets to go round the tops ; 
G is an ornament (if chofe) to go betwixt the feet of the table that has the 
term feet. 



PLATES xxxV. and xxxvi. 









m 



A 



R E two Sideboard Tables, with their proper dimenfions and mouldings at 
large, fo that there needs no farther explanation. 






PLATES XXXVII. and XXXVIII. 



ARE two Sideboard Tables ; in plate XXXVII. 1 have put double feet, which 
J[jL is fometimes required, and has a very good effed. The mouldings are at 
large, and the dimenfions fix'd to the defign. Plate XXXVIII. has two different 
feet, which are both cut through, as likewife the rail ; the dimenfions are alfo to 
the defign. 



... „.::-■ 



PLATES XXXIX. and XL. 






PLATE XXXIX. is a Gothic Table with different feet, the one folid, the 
other cut thro' ; the folid foot is oh the right hand ; A is the fquare foot, 
and bb, &c. the rails morticed into the foot g ; g is the plan of the moulding g - y 
Fe is the moulding for the top, drawn round the two front columns ; Fe in the 

plan 



[ ** ] 

plan D, is the moulding in the plan D, which goes round the frame ; e is the finall 
aftragal which is turn'd upon the column. 

Plate XL. is a Sideboard Table with two different forts of feet, the rail and feet 
all open, the mouldings at large on the right hand, the dimenfions are fix'd to 
the defign. 



PLATES XLL and XLII. 

LATE XLI. is a Bureau Dreffing-Table with it dimenfions and mouldings 
at large, ornamented with fretwork, &*c. 

Plate XLII. is for the fame ufe ; the dimenfions are fixed to the defign. 



P 



PLATES XLIIL and XLIV- 

TWO French Commode Tables. Plate XLIII. has its Dimenfions with a Scale ; 
A is one half of the plan ; B is the upright of the Table, and by the 
fcale you may take off its proportions. 

Plate XLIV. is a Table which will have a very good effeel: ; the ornament round 
the top may be omitted, if required. A is the plan of the top, with a proper 
fcale to take off its fize. 



PLATE XLV. 

A French Commode Table with its proper ornaments ; fome part of the carv- 
ing may be omitted, as the workman fhall think convenient. A ii half the 
plan, B is the upright of the Table ; C is the moulding for the top. 






PLATE XLVL 

IS a French Commode Table with folding doors in the middle, and drawers at 
each end. There are two different defigns for the doors, and likewife two diffe- 
rent forts of feet. The meafures are fpecified at the end. A is the whole plan of 
the Table; the dotted lines ccc, Sfa are a method for defcribing the front; the 
ends are beft drawn by hand ; bb i* the bignefs of the end drawers. 



P L ATE 



[ i3 1 



i-it 



PLATE XLVII. 



IS a French Commode Table, with doors or drawers in front, and drawers at each 
end y the middle part may be made with Aiding fhelves to hold cloaths. This 
Commode, made by a fkillful workman, and of fine wood, will give great fatis- 
fadiion ; the feet at each end are different for better choice. A is the half plan ; B 
the end drawer, &c. the mouldings are at large on the right hand. 



■ 



PLATE XLVIIL 

IS a French Commode Table with doors at each end, and drawers in the 
middle ; the ornaments on each door are drawn differently, as likewife the terms 
that go down each corner ; the feet are not difagreeable to the defign, and I will 
venture to fay that this Table, if made by one who knows his bufinefs, will give 
great fatisfa&ion, and have a very fine appearance. A is the half plan ; B the up- 
right of the work, with a fcale to take off the dimenfions. 



PLATE XLIX. 



A Writing Table, the front feet to draw out, with a double rifing top, as in 
profile Dj e e is the Table top , h is a horfe that turns up ; G is part of 
the front rail morticed into the foot, which draws out with the front, and parts at 
C ; G is the end rail morticed into the foot, as you fee by the prick'd line ; a is 
the end of the drawer, with its grooves for the Aider and bottom as at a in the 
plan ; F is the turn'd column glued into the corner of the foot. 






PLATE L. 

IS a Writing-Table, the front to draw out as the former ; the feet parts at hhh, 
SPc. and come out with the front rail. A is the plan of the Table with its 
partitions ; g is a quadrant drawer for ink, fand, SrV. D is the profile of the 
drawer-end ; BB is the plan of the open part of the foot ; ccc the plan of the 
moulding at the bottom ; f f the projection of the Table top. 



D 



PLATE 




[ H ] 



PLATE LI. 



S a Writing- Table, the two middle feet of which come out with the drawer ; 
the drawers at each end are for fand, ink, paper, &Pc. A is the plan of the 
Table ; B is the flap that rifes to write on if required ; C B is the whole Aider that 
Aides in the drawer fides as in the profile ; F and D D are the end drawers ; E is 
the profile of the Table. 



PLATE LII. 






IS a Gothic Writing-Table, with one long drawer at the top, doors at each 
end, drawers in the infide, and a recefs for the knees, as you fee in the plan 
B ; the columns are fixed to the door, and open with them ; A is the whole plan ; 
hhh, &C. is the columns in the plan Cddd, SsrV. Eg is the plan of the Table 
top ; f f is the plan of the mouldings ff, which go round the columns; the di- 
menfions of every thing are fpecified to this defign. This Table has been made 
more than once from this defign, and has a better appearance when executed than in 
the drawing. 

PLATES LIIL LIV. LV. and LVI. 

AR E four Library Tables, with proper dimensions fixed to each defign ; they 
are generally made with doors on one fide of the Table, and upright Aiding 
partitions, (to anfwer the different fizes of books) and drawers on the other fide. 
Thofe Tables are fo plain and intelligible, that no more is needful to be faid about 
them. They frequently ftand in the middle of a room, which requires both fides 
to be made ufeful. 



PLATE LVII 

A Library Table, with all its dimenfions fixed to the defign. You have two 
different doors and terms. This Table is intended to have circular doors at 
each corner, which may be made for convenience at pleafure. 

PLATES 



[ '5 ] 



I 



PLATES LVIII. and LIX. 

PLATE LVIII. is a Gothic Library Table, the corners canted, and a Gothic 
i column is fixed at each corner ; then that fixed upon the doors, and opens 
with them. Plate LIX. is the plan of the Table with all its mouldings j.aaa, Sec. are 
the places where the columns are to be fet ; A is the plan of the columns, with a 
fcale to take off the particulars of every member. 

F i g. I. Plate LIX. is a method for working and mitering of mouldings of dif- 
ferent projections. Suppofe B a quarter of a circle, or moulding, divided into nine 
parts, and the laft divifion into two parts ; then plan the moulding B at D, and 
divide it into the fame number of parts ; draw a diagonal, fuppofe LL, and where 
the divifions interfed in LL, draw the divifion in A ; then raife perpendiculars from 
A, and you have the projection of the other moulding at B. Now where the per- 
pendiculars 1234, &c. interfedls in B, draw eee, &rV. to ddd, §rV. then where 
they interfecl: in ddd, are the points where the moulding is to be traced or drawn 
by hand. To cut the mitres, fuppofe the mouldings work'd at FF, and fit for the 
mitres to be cut, draw a line crofs your mouldings fff, f&c. then take the diftance CL 
and fet it off at c f, and the diviiions at A ; then take the diftance eL, and fet it 
off at ef, and the divifions at D ; raife perpendiculars at C and E ; then draw the 
parallels eee, &c. to the perpendiculars C and E, and where they interfeel, are the 
points where you are to cut, directed by the diagonal line LL. 




PLATES lx. Lxr. and lxii. 

AR E three Library Book-Cafes of different forts, with their dimenfions and 
mouldings all fixed to the defigns. If you have occafion to alter their fizes, 
it would be well to keep as nigh the fame proportion as pofiible ; otherwife the 
upper doors may have but an ill appearance. It would be needlefs to fay any thing 
more about them, as their forms are fo eafy. 

Thofe Book-cafes are all intended for glafs doors. 





PLATES LXIIL and LXIV. 



PLATE LXIIL is a Library Book-Cafe with all its dimenfions ; and LXIV. is 
the mouldings at large, with a fcale calculated for that ufe ; the method for 
making of it is this ; Take the height of the top part of your book-cafe, from the 
upper part of the pedeftal to the top of the cornice, and divide it into twenty equal 

parts, 



[ 16 ] 

parts ; one of which is divided in three equal parts one way, and into four the other 
way ; then divide one of thefe parts into twelve equal parts, as you fee fpecified, 
and draw a diagonal from corner to corner in one divifion, to take off an half, 
quarter, or three quarters, &c. The mouldings are all drawn from this fcale, and 
this method muft be ufed for all the book-cafes in the book. This cornice is diffe- 
rent from that in the defign, but there are other cornices of the fame fort with that 
in the drawing. 



PLATES LXV. and LXVI. 



PLATE LXV. is a Library Book-Cafe. The dimenfions are all fixM to the 
defign. Plate LXVI. is the mouldings at large, fet off by the fcale, with 
block cornice different from that in the book-cafe ; the fcale is made after the fame 
method as that in the plate N°. lxiv. 



PLATES LXVII. and LXVIIL 

PLATE LXVII. is a Library Book-Cafe, with its profile and fcale; and 
LXVIIL is the mouldings all at large, fet off by the fcale, made in the fame 
method as plate lxiv. This book-cafe will be very beautiful if neatly executed. 



PLATES LXIX. and LXX. 

PLATE lxix. is a Library B ook-Cafe in Perfpective-; the dimenfions are all 
fixed to the defign ; and plate lxx. are all the mouldings at large, with the 
fcale made in the fame manner as in plate lxiv. It would be needlefs to fay any 
more of this book-cafe, as the defign demonftrates what it is. 



PLATES LXXI. and LXXII. 

ILATE lxxi. is a neat Gothic Library Book-Cafe, with a profile and fcale. 
This book-cafe, mad« by an ingenious workman, will have the defired effect. 
Plate lxxii. is the mouldings, all the fame, except the block cornice. The fcale is 
made after the fame manner as the preceding. 



PLATES 



[ '7 ] 









PLATES LXXIIL and LXXIV 

pLATE lxxiii. is a Gothic Library Book-Cafe, no way inferior to the fore^ 
A goingone ; the profile and fcale is on the right hand. Plate lxxi v. is the mould- 
ings at large, fet off by the fame fcale as the former. The cornice for this book- 
cafe is different from that in the defign. 

PLATES LXXV. and LXXVL 

T)LATE lxxv. is a rich Gothic Library Book-Cafe, with Gothic columns fixd 
A upon the doors, to open with them ; the doors are different, but may be made 
alike if required. This defign is perhaps one of the beft of its kind, and would 
give me great pleafure to fee it executed, as I doubt not of its making an exceeding 
genteel and grand appearance ; the upper doors are to be glazed. Plate lxxvi. is 
all the mouldings at large, with a plan of the column on the door. This is made 
after the method defcribed in lxiv. 

PLATE lxxvil 

TS a Defk and B ook-Cafe, with all its dimenfions and mouldings properly fixed. 

PLATES LXXVIII. and LXXIX. 

T)LATE lxxviii. is a Defk and Book- Cafe ; the middle door is intended for 
A glafs. The middle part of the Defk is drawers, and two defigns of doors at 
each end. Within the doors may be fixed upright partitions for books, which will 
be very convenient. The ornaments of this will make it look very agreeable ; the 
meafures are all fixed. Plate lxxix. is the mouldings for it at large. 



1 









PLATES LXXX. and LXXXI. 

T)L ATE lxxx. is a Defk and Book-Cafe in the Chinefe tafte ; the doors are in- 
A tended for glafs, and will look extremely well. The fmall columns in the ca- 
nopy above the cornice, projed forwards. The fretwork at the bottom of the 
Book-Cafe is for two fmall drawers ; the dimenfions are fix'd to the defign. Plate 
lxxxi. is the mouldings for it at large. 



E 



PLATE 



•■:«■ 



i 






I 



3 



[ i8 ] 



PLATE LXXXii. 

IS a Defk and Book-Gafe, with ornaments on the fides and top of it, and two 
defigns of the defk part below, with dimenfions fixed to the whole. This, pro- 
perly made, will look very well. The doors muft be glazed. 

PLATE LXXXIIL 

IS a fmall Defk and Book-Cafe in the Gothic tafte : The door is for glafs, and 
to be all in one ; the bottom part to ftand upon a frame. The fwelling part at 
the bottom of the book-cafe is for a drawer ; the dimenfions are all fixed to the 
defign. 1 he infide of the desk is drawn below. 



PLATE LXXXIV. 

IS a Bureau Desk and Book-cafe, with a Gothic ornament on the top, and glafs 
doors to the book-cafe. The front of the desk is two different defigns for 
doors, or drawers ; the fizes are fixed to the drawing. 



A 



PLATES LXXXV. and LXXXVI. 

RE two Chefts of Drawers; the dimenfions and mouldings are all fixed to the 
defigns. 



PLATE LXXVII. 

IS a Cheft of Drawers upon a frame, of two different defigns. The door in the 
upper part is intended for glafs. A is the plan of the whole, with the fcale to 
take off the fize of every particular ; the mouldings are at large on the right 
hand. 



PLATE LXXXVIII. 

IS a Cheft of Drawers with Hiding fhelves for cloaths. There are two defigns of 
doors for the top and bottom part. The top door is intended for glafs ; the fret 
at the top of the bottom part may be made into two drawers. A is the plan with 

the fcale. The mouldings are at large on the right hand. 

5 & & PLATE 



[ 19 ] 






PLATE lxxxix. 



IS a Bureau Dreffing-Cheft and Book-Cafe ; the middle door is for glafs, and 
drawers or doors on each fide ; the top neatly carved will look well ; the fret in 
the bottom is intended for a drawer ; A is the profile of the defign ; the line B is 
the depth of the recefs for the knees ; the mouldings are at large on the right 
hand. 



PLATE XC. 

T S a Dreffing-Cheft (or Table) and Book-Cafe ; the doors are all intended for 
A glafs ; the fret in the bottom is for the dreffing drawer ; the lower part may be 
drawers or doors ; the dimenfions are all fixed to the defign ; the mouldings are all 
at large on the right hand. 






,iinh 



PLATE XCI 



T S a plain Cabinet intended for Japan, the mouldings are all at large, and the 



fizes fixed to the defign. 



PLATE XCII. 

IS a Cabinet with two different feet, and only one door ; the other without the 
door fhews the defign of the infide ; the mouldings are at large, and the dimen- 
fions fixed to the Cabinet ; the work that is upon the door, is to be carv'd neatly 
out of thin fluff, and glued upon the pannel. 



PLATE XCIII. 



Ql 



IS a Chinefe Cabinet with drawers in the middle part, and two different forts of 
doors at each end. The bottom drawer is intended to be all in one ; the di- 
menfions and mouldings are all fixed to the defign. This Cabinet, finifried accord- 
ing to the drawing, and by a good workman, will, I am confident, be very genteel. 



PLATE XCIV. 

IS a Gothic Cabinet without doors ; the fretwork at the bottom of the cabinet 
is intended for a drawer ; the upper forms a fort of Gothic arches, fupported 
by whole terms in the middle, and half-ones at the ends, and drawers betwixt. 

The 






[ 20 ] 

The fhaded parts B B B are intended to be open, and fretwork on the edge of the 
{helves ; the upper fretwork is cut through ; the mouldings are at large on the right 
hand, and a fcale to take off the particulars. 



PLATE XCV. 

A Gothic Cabinet upon term feet ; the middle is a door with columns glued 
to it ; the doors and columns open together, and intended for glafs 
The ornaments and feftoons upon the glafs 'will look very well ; the bottom 
drawer D is to be all in one, with two drawers above it ; the other opening 
will hold Chinefe figures, or any thing elfe that may be thought agreeable. C B A 
are the mouldings at large, with a fcale to take off the particulars. The whole, a 
if juftly finifhed, will make a handfome and elegant piece of furniture. 



PLATES XCVI. XCVII. and XCVIII. 



c 



LOATHS Preffes or Chefts, which need no defcription, their meafures be- 
ing all fixed to the defigns, and the ufe of them is well known. 



A 



PLATE XCIX. 

Cloaths-Prefs, and a Cloaths-Cheft ; the cloaths-prefs has two doors, of dif- 
ferent defigns ; the dimenfions are all properly fix'd. 



l 






I 



PLATES C. and CI. 



1 



THREE other defigns of Cloaths Chefts ; one with a Gothic rail and diffe- 
rent feet, and ornaments for the front. The other cheft has two defigns ; 
the one in the French tafte, the other the Gothic. Either of the chefts, when 
executed, will look exceeding well ; the mouldings and dimenfions are all fixed 
to the defigns. 



A 



PLATE CII. 

High Cloaths-Prefs, with two drawers in the bottom part. The meafures 
and mouldings are all fpecified. 

plate cm. 



A Commode Cloaths Prefs, with two different defigns for the doors. B is the 
plan of the upper part, and A is the plan of the lower ; the dimenfions are 
all fpecified, and mouldings at large, with a fret to go round the upper part. 

P L A T E 






[ 20 ] 



I 



PLATE CIV. 

ACloaths Prefs, with a Commode pedeftal part, and different ornaments for 
the corners and feet, and different doors for the top part. Within the doors 
Aiding (helves are intended. The line A is the plan of the bottom part, and the 
line B is the plan of the upper part with a proper fcale ; the mouldings are at large 
on the right hand. 






■ 






PLATE CV. 

A Neat China Cafe, with glafs- doors. The feet are cut through ; the fretwork 
is glued upon the rail, and divided into three drawers at length; the 
fizes are all fixed to the defign, and mouldings at large on the right hand. The 
ends of the piece of work are intended to be the fame as the end doors. This de- 
fign is fo intelligible that it is needlels to fay any more by way of explanation. 

PLATES CVI. and CVII. 

PLATE cvi. is a China Cafe with glafs doors, and fretwork glued upon the 
pannels of the bottom doors. The fretwork upon the top part above the 
cornice is cut through. I have executed this defign, and it looks much better than 
in the drawing. The fizes are all fixed to the work. 

Plate cvn. is the mouldings and fretwork for the above defign. 



PLATE CVIII. 

IS a China Cafe with glafs in the doors and ends. You have two different feet, 
which, with the rail, are all cut through. This defign I have executed with 
great fatisfa&ion to the purchafer. The mouldings and dimenfions are all fixed to 
the drawings. This canopy projects more at the ends than in front, therefore the 
workman muft have recourfe to Plate lix. Fig. i. for the proper directions to exe- 
cute it. 






PLATE CIX. 

IS a very neat China Cafe upon a frame, with glafs doors in the front and ends ; 
the profile is on the right hand ; betwixt the middle feet is a ftretcher, with a 
little eanopy, which will hold a fmall figure. This defign muft be executed by the 
hands of an ingenious workman, and when neatly japann'd will appear very 
beautiful. 



PLATE 



[ R» 



i 






... 



PLATE CX. 

IS a large China Cafe, with glafs doors ; the upper part, where the fmall columns 
are, is intended to be open ; the profile is on the right hand, and the fcale to 
take off the particulars. This defign is calculated purely for holding china, or for 
fome apartment, where it is frequently put. It will be needlefs to fay any thing in 
its praife, as I hope the defign will in fome meafure recommend itfelf, both for ufe 
and ornament. 



PLATE CXL 

A China Cafe, not only the richeft and moft magnificent in the whole, 
but perhaps in all Europe. I had a particular pleafure in retouching and 
finifhing this defign, but mould have much more in the execution of it, as I am 
confident I can make the work more beautiful and ftriking than the drawing. The 
proportion and harmony of the feveral parts will then be view'd with advantage, 
and reflect mutual beauty upon each other. The ornaments will appear more na- 
tural and graceful, and the whole conftrudtion will be fo much improv'd under the 
ingenious hand of a workman, as to make it fit to adorn the moft elegant apartment. 
The dimenfions and mouldings are all fpecified, and for making the canopy the 
artift is referred to Plate lix. Fig. i. 



T 



PLATE CXII. 

WO defigns of hanging fhelves ; the profile for that with the canopy is upon 
the left hand. 



PLATE CXIII. 






TW O other defigns of hanging fhelves ; the flielf at B is intended to have a 
a glafs door, for better fecurityj if required ; b is the profile of B • a is the 
profile of A ; the fcale is at bottom. 



T 



P L A t E CXIV. 

W O defigns of hanging fhelves, the one Gothic, the other in the Chi- 
nefe manner , the fcale and plan you have at bottom. 



PLATE 






t n ] 



1 






PLATE CXV. 

TH I S is a defign of a Chinefe flielf ftanding upon feet ; A is the profile of 
it ; the fcale is at the bottom. It will be very neat, if made by a good 
hand. 

PLATE CXVI. 

THIS defign, if executed by a good workman will be very neat. C is the 
plan of the flielf; A is the profile of the whole ; B i s the profile of the cir- 
cular work B ; the fcale is fixed to take off the dimenfions. 



II 



i 












PLATE CXVII. 

A China Shelf upon feet, with a dome top. B is the plan of the flielf, and 
A is the profile of the defign, with a fcale to take off the particulars. 

PLATE CXVIII. 

pHI S defign will look exceeding well, if executed and japann'd neatly. The 

-■- fretwork at the ends is defigned for doors ; the fupporters for the canopy at 

each end ftand at the corners, and are joined together in the middle. The feet at 

the bottom are pierced through ; all the other parts are exceedingly eafy. A is the 

plan with a fcale. 

PLATE cxix. 

PHIS defign of a Chinefe Shelf, I hope will afford fome fatisfaction to the be- 

A holders, if rightly executed. It is very light but ftrong, and will, if I am 

not miftaken, be allowed among the beft that has ever been made. The fretwork 

at the ends is intended for doors ; A is the plan of the whole; BB, &c. are the 

plans of bbb ; the fcale is below the plans. 



r 









i 












PLATE cxx 

HpHREE Candle-ftands ; the ftand B is compofed of fretwork; three of thofe 
A are to be glued together to make the whole compleat. A is the plan of a ; 
the others need no farther explanation to a workman. 

PLATE 



C 24 ] 



PLATE CXXI. 

THREE Candle-ftands. Thefe are all intended to bold a certain number 
of candles ; as that on the left hand to hold fev«p ; the middle ftand to 
hold three at the fides, and a brafs branch in the middle, on the top, with more ; 
that on the right hand is for three brafs branches, and one large one on the top 
You have likewife a plan of the claws, with their projeaions. The heights are all 
fix'd, but may be made higher if requifite. 

PLATE CXXH 

THREE Candle-ftands in a different tafte ; the heights are fixed, and the 
defigns fo plain, that little needs be faid to a workman, and a gentleman 
wants no directions, 

PLATE CXXIII. 

THREE defigns of Stands, intended for carving, and nothing of directions 
can be faid concerning then), as their being well executed depends on the 
judgment of the workman. 

PLATES CXXIV. «d CXXV 

SIX different defigns of Fire-Screens. Plate cxxiv. A and B, are two Fire- 
screens, each with two leaves. The fretwork round the paper of each may 
be cut through 5 the other is a Screen upon a pillar and claw, to flide up and down 
at pleafure. 

In Plate cxxv. the Screen at A is for two leaves, and will look very well when 
open. It will be beft for burnifhed gold. The other two are on pillars and claws, 
and I flatter myfelf they are among the beft of the fort. 

PLATES CXXVI. and CXXVII. 

PLATE cxxvi. two defigns of Horfe Fire-Screens. Thefe Screens are intend- 
ed to Hide up, out of the pillars that are on each fide ; A and B is the pro- 
file of the two different claws ; the fizes are fix'd to the fcreens. 

Plate cxxvu. is two other defigns of Horfe Fire-Screens; the carver muft be the 
man to execute this fort of work. A and B is the profile of the claws. 

PLATES 






■ 



t *5 ] 






PLATES CXXVIII. and CXXIX. 

SIX defignsfor Tea-Chcfts. AAA, &c. are the plans for them. All the 
fcales are below the plans ; the cheft in plate cxxix. on the left hand, is in- 
tended to be made of filver, Sfk and chafed. 



PLATE CXXX. 

FOUR plans or defigns for Tea-Trays or Voiders, with a proper fret annexed 
to each plan. 



Ml 












P 



PLATES CXXXL and CXXXII. 

LATE cxxx i. is three Brackets for Buftos, &>c. AAA are the plans of each. 



Plate cxxxn. is three other Brackets for the fameufe; the fmall ones be- 
low are made out of thin wood ; an half one is fattened to the back, and proje&s 
to the front of the fhelf, as that on the left hand. 









PLATES CXXXIII. and CXXXIV. 

PLATE cxxxiii. is three different defigns of Brackets for marble Slabs; A and 
B the ornaments for the front rails. Plate cxxxiv. is three other defigns for 
marble Slabs ; A is a front rail that will ferve for both table*. 









PLATES CXXXV. and CXXXVI 

JLATE cxxxv. is two defigns of Clock-cafes ; that on the right hand has terms 
up the middle part ; A is the plan of the body part ; ee is the plan of the 
terms at the corners ; B is the plan of the head : c is the vafe at top ; D is the 
proie&ion of the cornice ; that on the left hand has an ornament upon the door ; 
A is the plan of the body part ; B is the plan of the head ; c the projection of the 
cornice ; and b the column. Plate cxxxvi. is two other defigns of the lame kind ; 
the one has Gothic columns up the corners, with a commode pedeftal ; the body 
part of the other, is in the manner of a term ; their plans are below the defigns. 









I 



PLATE 



[ 26 ] 



PLATE cxxxvn. 

' | ■* W O defigns of Table Clock-cafes ; the fcales and half-plans are fixed below ; 
A A is the plan of the top above the moulding ; B is the plan of the body of 
the cafe ; E E is the ornament down the cants ; c the bafe at the bottom, and D 
the plan of the cornice. 

PLATE CXXXVIII. 

TWO defigns of Table Clock-cafes, with the fcale, and half the plans of 
both ; that on the right hand has terms, or an attic ftory above the columns • 
c is its plan ; D is the plan of the bafe ; A is the projection of the cornice ; ef is 
tl^ plan of the columns at the corners. That on the left hand, efpecially, will, I 
hope, give great pleafure to the purchafer, and if executed by a fine workman, will 
make the defired appearance. The ornament that goes round the glafs is intended 
to open, or be for the door ; c is its plan ; B the projection of the bafe ; A is the 
plan of the cornice ; ef is the plan of the columns. You have the fcale they were 
drawn by. 



PLATES CXXXIX. and CXL, 

ILATE CXXXIX. is fix different defigns of Bed-cornices. . Plate CXL. is four 
, different defigns of Gerandoles to hold candles, very proper for illuminating of 



rooms, ore. 



PLATES CXLL CXLII. CXLIII. CXLIV. 
CXLV. CXL VI. and CXLVII. 



A 



R E all different defigns of Pier-Glafs Frames, and other ornaments, which 
I hope will give fatisfaction to thofe who have them made. 



F 



PLATE CXLVIII. 



OUR defigns of Slab Frames, which I refer to the tafte and judgment of the 
fkillful workman. 



PLATE 



C 2 7 ] 






E 



PLATE CXLIX- 

IGHT different defigns of Shields, very proper for the openings of pedi- 
ments, &c. F 



PLATES CL CLI CLII. CLIII. CUV. 

CLV. and CLVL 

A Great variety of different Frets, very proper for ornaments in the cabinet 
and chair branches, and may be very ufeful in other arts. 

PLATES CLVII. CLVIII CLIX and CLX 

A Variety of Chinefe railing, very proper for gardens and other places, and 
-T* may be converted (by the ingenious workman) to other ufes. 






















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leave* mended vhere neoessa-rv. 
Frontispiece flattened. »ew 
endpHper alsnatureg with wi- 
ll e&ohed linen hinges* rebound 
In full oloth. 

Sky Neadov bindery 

Kovetrber 1J8U 



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